Open the Hips with Frog Pose {Yin Series}

Yin yoga’s Frog Pose is one of the more intense poses of the practice, and when I’m teaching it it’s often accompanied by a few moans and groans.  Remember how we talked about Yin stressing the connective tissue instead of the muscles? Well, Frog Pose puts a fair amount of stress on the hip joint and this is something that does not go unnoticed :).  But the benefits of Frog Pose largely outweigh the few moments of discomfort.  This deep groin opener targets the adductors, but also leaves a mild backbend in the small of the back and can also benefit digestion as well as cramps.  A yogi with a bad low back should be wary of any pain (not discomfort) in the pose.

To come into Frog, begin in Child’s Pose.  Start to slide the hands out, but keep the glutes on top of the heels.  As you come forward separate the knees while still sitting on the heels.  Feet can be pointed in or out and blankets may be used for padding of the feet or knees.  Frog Pose is one that is very individual to each yogi.  The amount of flexibility in the hips largely influences where the rest of the body will end up.  So spend a few moments finding your edge, that “sweet spot” between discomfort and pain.  Once you’ve established your edge, bring your focus to the sensation in your hips.  This can be a great lesson in contentment.  Instead of trying to avoid the discomfort that arises in both life and yoga, experience it and breathe into it.  Remain here from three to five minutes.  When the time comes to back out of the pose, do so in whichever way speaks to you.  Move slowly.  Your hips will be talking to you and they may even give you that “stuck” sensation but be patient, it will come.  Once you are able come to lie flat on your back.  After a few moments, hug the knees to the chest and do any movement that feels organic; circles, rocking, or anything else that appeals to you.

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